Question:

What is the correct way to address a bishop?

  1. Sir
  2. Your Grace
  3. My Lord

Answer

My Lord; ‘Lord Bishop’ is a traditional form of address used for bishops since the Middle Ages, an era when bishops occupied the feudal rank of ‘lord’ by virtue of their office. Today it is sometimes still used in formal circumstances for any diocesan bishop in the Anglican Communion or Roman Catholic Church (except in countries, such as the United States, where this title is deemed inappropriate); it is not restricted to the 26 Church of England bishops who sit in the House of Lords as Lords Spiritual. Bishops in the House of Lords are addressed as The Right Reverend Prelate the Lord Bishop of …

Question:

Where is the only road in Britain on which you drive on the right?

  1. Savoy Court
  2. Bishopsgate
  3. The M1 Motorway

Answer

Savoy Court; For more than 100 years now vehicles, be they horse drawn or mechanical, have entered and left ‘Savoy Court’ on the right-hand side of the road. This is due primarily to the construction of the ‘court’. When approaching and leaving the hotel it is easier to do so while driving on the right-hand side of the road. Savoy Court is privately owned property. It is not a public thoroughfare as it leads only to the hotel itself. Therefore driving on the right-hand side of the road does not contravene British traffic regulations.

Finally, it may be of interest to note that when being chauffeured in a horse-drawn carriage the lady or dignitary would traditionally sit behind the driver. By approaching the hotel on the right-hand side of the road, either the chauffeur or the hotel’s doorman was able to open the door without walking around the car. This would allow the lady to alight from the carriage and walk straight into the hotel. Rory Macfarlane, Press Office, Savoy Hotel, London WC2.

Question:

Who said “It is kind of fun to do the impossible”?

  1. Walt Disney
  2. Steve Jobs
  3. Bill Gates

Answer

Walt Disney; Disney was particularly noted as an entrepreneur, film maker and popular showman, as well as an innovator in animation and theme park design. He and his staff created numerous famous fictional characters including Mickey Mouse (of which Disney himself originally voiced), Goofy and Donald Duck. One of the most well-known motion picture producers in the world, Disney was also the cartoon artist of comic books and newspaper comic strips.

Question:

Who said “The problem is not the problem; The problem is your attitude about the problem”?

  1. Capt. Jack Sparrow
  2. Bisopsgate’s Glasgow Mgr.
  3. Duncan Bannatyne

Answer

Capt. Jack Sparrow; A very pertinent quote from the character Captain Jack Sparrow in the film franchise Pirates of the Caribbean.

Question:

Who said “Don’t cry because it is over, smile because it happened”?

  1. Dr Spock
  2. Dr Seuss
  3. Dr Livingstone

Answer

Dr Seuss; Dr Seuss was actually the pen name of American writer and illustrator Theodor Seuss Geisel, which he coined whilst at university. Geisel had a notable career straight from university, going to work as a cartoonist and illustrator for publications such as ‘Life’ and ‘Vanity Fair’, but he achieved his greatest successes post World War II, with the children’s books “If I Ran the Zoo”, “Horton Hears a Who!”, “If I Ran the Circus”, throughout the 1950’s culminating in his most famous stories “The Cat in the Hat”, “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” and “Green Eggs and Ham”

Question:

Where was the first tarmac road built in England?

  1. Bishopsgate, London in 1898
  2. Radcliffe Road, Nottingham in 1902
  3. Hagley Road, Birmingham in 1904

Answer

Radcliffe Road, Nottingham in 1902; At the time of his discovery, Edgar Hooley had his discovery of tarmac whilst working as a surveyor for Nottinghamshire County. In 1901 he was walking in Denby in Derbyshire when he noticed a smooth stretch of road close to an ironworks. He asked locals what had happened and was told a barrel of tar had fallen from a dray and burst open. Someone had poured waste slag from the nearby furnaces to cover up the mess. Hooley noticed this unintentional resurfacing had solidified the road – there was no rutting and no dust. By 1902 Hooley had patented the process of heating tar, adding slag to the mix and then breaking stones within the mixture to form a smooth road surface. Having perfected the operation, Hooley began transforming road surfaces and Nottingham’s Radcliffe Road became the first tarmac road in the world.

Question:

In which city was Britain’s first professional police force established?

  1. London
  2. Belfast
  3. Glasgow

Answer

Glasgow; In 1737 An Act was passed ‘for better regulating the Night Watch’ of the City of London which directed the number of paid constables to be on duty each night. Henry Fielding established the Bow Street Runners in 1749; between 1754 and 1780, Sir John Fielding reorganised Bow Street like a police station, with a team of efficient, paid constables. In the early 19th century some town authorities took the initiative of stepping up their policing arrangements. An Act of Parliament in 1800 enabled Glasgow to establish its own city police force – the first professional police force in Britain.

Question:

Which country other than England has a city called London and a river called the Thames?

  1. Canada
  2. New Zealand
  3. USA

Answer

Canada; The Thames River is located in south-western Ontario, Canada. The Thames flows west 273 Kilometres (170 miles) through south-western Ontario, through the cities of Woodstock, London and Chatham to Lighthouse Cove on Lake St. Clair. Its drainage basin is 5,825 square Kilometres (2,249 sq. miles).

Question:

A discovery by Professor Wilhelm Roentgen in the 1890s led to which amazing medical invention?

  1. X-Ray
  2. Ultra Sound
  3. Dental Fillings

Answer

X-Ray; Roentgen was a German physicist, who, on 8 November 1895, produced and detected electromagnetic radiation in a wavelength range today that was known as X-rays or Roentgen rays, an achievement that earned him the first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901. In honour of his accomplishments, in 2004 the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) named element 111, roentgenium, a radioactive element with multiple unstable isotopes, after him.

Question:

In New York, 1913, there were more electric cars than petrol ones. Why did this change?

  1. Electric starter motor
  2. Battery development
  3. Cost

Answer

Electric starter motor; In 1912 Charles Kettering invented the first practical electric starter, eliminating an advantage that electric cars held over petrol cars. By 1929 the electric car failed to compete and faded out of popularity; they were charged higher fees for their higher weight (due to batteries), they were limited to shorter distances with few charging stations, are not as powerful. At the same time the electric starter and cheap gasoline made gas cars became more desirable.

Question:

Who said “never mistake motion for action”?

  1. Sir Ernest Hemingway
  2. Sir Winston Churchill
  3. Sir Richard Branson

Answer

Sir Ernest Hemingway; Ernest Miller Hemingway was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954

Question:

When was the first truck built?

  1. 1896
  2. 1886
  3. 1906

Answer

1896; Daimler built the worlds first truck in 1896 and while it is true that the world’s first truck initiated motorized road transport as we know it today, it did not attract a single buyer in Germany. In the early stages, the truck had to overcome a great deal of resistance – much more than the passenger car. Unlike the car, the truck had a hard time winning recognition in the early days. Whereas the high society had welcomed the car with open arms as an enrichment of their personal freedom, the truck came up against severe skepticism in industry: capital goods had to earn money. And of course, Gottlieb Daimler’s first truck was matured only to a limited extent – even though its time had definitely come.

Question:

Which city is 402 miles from Cardiff, 156 miles from Newcastle and 149 miles from Aberdeen?

  1. London
  2. Manchester
  3. Glasgow

Answer

Glasgow; It can be easy to forget just how far it is from Bishopsgate’s Glasgow depot to Aberdeen.

Question:

Which street in London takes its name from a croquet-like game once played by Charles I?

  1. The Strand
  2. Pall Mall
  3. Long Acre

Answer

Pall Mall;Although croquet is a rather young sport, its ancestry can be traced at least to the 14th century, and there are a couple of stories about how it originated. One is that lawn bowlers developed an indoor form of their sport to be played during the winter, adding hoops and mallets to make the game more challenging on the much smaller playing area. This indoor version of lawn bowling then moved back outdoors and become known in France as paille-maille (“ball-mallet”). The other is that paille-maille was originally a form of outdoor billiards. However, judging by what scanty documentation there is, billiards seems to have come along about a century later. It’s quite possible that the movement went the other way and that paille-maille moved indoors and become billiards.

Question:

Who said “man who dares to waste one hour of time has not discovered the value of life”?

  1. Charles Darwin
  2. Dr Who
  3. Jeremy Clarkson

Answer

Charles Darwin; Charles Darwin was an English naturalist who outlined the theory of evolution and proposed that it could be explained in part through natural selection. This theory is now an integral component of biological science. Darwin first wrote this famous quote in a letter to his sister Susan Elizabeth Darwin on 4th August 1836.

Question:

Where are the fastest muscles in the human body?

  1. Brain
  2. Heart
  3. Eye

Answer

Eye; The eye muscle is the fastest reacting muscle of the whole body, contracting in less than 1/100th of a second.

Question:

Which London bridge boasts a chimney?

  1. Tower Bridge
  2. London Bridge
  3. Battersea Bridge

Answer

Tower Bridge; A keen observer crossing the bridge may notice that one of the lamp posts on the bridge looks very different from the rest, in fact, it is wider than the rest and has no light on it! On closer inspection it can be seen that this is actually a flue which services a small room under the bridge. It is believed that the room would have originally been used as a guard post where Royal Fusiliers would have been stationed while protecting the Tower of London.

Question:

In what year was the first ball point pen made?

  1. 1988
  2. 1788
  3. 1888

Answer

1888; The first patent for a ballpoint pen was issued on 30 October 1888, to John J. Loud, a leather tanner, who was attempting to make a writing instrument that would be able to write on his leather products, which then-common fountain pens could not. Loud’s pen had a small rotating steel ball, held in place by a socket. Although it could be used to mark rough surfaces such as leather, as Loud intended, it proved to be too coarse for letter-writing. With no commercial viability, its potential went unexploited and the patent eventually lapsed.

Question:

Where did the longest traffic jam ever recorded take place?

  1. Beijing, China
  2. London, England
  3. Moscow, Russia

Answer

Beijing, China in August 2010; Imagine being trapped in a 62-mile long traffic jam that lasted for an incredible 12 days. That’s just what happened to the poor folks attempting to traverse the Beijing-Tibet expressways in August of 2010, for which the trip took as long as three days. Not caused by closure or natural disaster, this all-time tie-up cause was simply the result of too many vehicles clogging the road, particularly a bevy of heavy trucks carrying construction supplies into Beijing, ironically for road work that was intended to help ease congestion.

Question:

The first known use of the word truck was in which year?

  1. 1611 – Wheels on a ships cannon
  2. 1800 – Carriage pulled by locomotive
  3. 1830 – Trailer pulled by a pantechnicon

Answer

1611 – Wheels on a ships cannon; The first known usage of “truck” was in 1611 when it referred to the small strong wheels on ships’ cannon carriages. In its extended usage it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads, a meaning known since 1771. With the meaning of “motor-powered load carrier”, it has been in usage since 1930, shortened from “motor truck”, which dates back to 1916.

Question:

The WD in WD40 Spray stands for Water Displacement, what does the 40 stand for?

  1. Norm Larsen was 40 years old when he invented it.
  2. It was the 40th attempt at creating the formula.
  3. It contains 40 various hydrocarbons.

Answer

It was the 40th attempt at creating the formula; WD-40 is the trademark name of a lubricant, penetrating oil and water-displacing spray. It was developed in 1953 by Norm Larsen, founder of the Rocket Chemical Company, in San Diego, California. WD-40, abbreviated from the phrase “Water Displacement, 40th formula,” was originally designed to repel water and prevent corrosion, and later was found to have numerous household uses.

Question:

Who is the largest tyre manufacturer in the world?

  1. Goodyear
  2. Lego Group
  3. Pirelli

Answer

Lego Group; Surprisingly, Lego Group is the world’s largest manufacturer of tyres by number of units (318 million in 2011). Lego manufactures toy tyres for its building block sets and began tyre production in 1962.

Question:

On 10th Dec 1868, where were the first traffic lights were installed in the UK?

  1. The Bishops Gate in the City of London
  2. The Marble Arch
  3. The Houses of Parliament

Answer

The Houses of Parliament; Installed by the railway engineer J. P. Knight, they resembled railway signals of the time, with semaphore arms and red and green gas lamps for night use. The gas lantern was turned with a lever at its base so that the appropriate light faced traffic. It exploded on 2 January 1869, injuring the policeman who was operating it.

Question:

Which famous British band included Bishopsgate in one of their songs?

  1. The Beatles
  2. The Rolling Stones
  3. Coldplay

Answer

The Beatles; John Lennon references Bishopsgate in The Beatles song “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!” from the album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. The song announces a travelling circus appearing at Bishopsgate. Lennon sings: “The celebrated Mr. K performs his feat on Saturday at Bishopsgate/The Hendersons will dance and sing as Mr. Kite flies through the ring, Don’t be late!” While the inspiration for the song was a playbill advertising Pablo Fanque’s Circus Royal’s February 1843 performance in Rochdale (part of Greater Manchester), Lennon changed the site to Bishopsgate in order to rhyme the lyric with “Don’t be late!”. Paul McCartney also performed a song called Bishopsgate at a one-off gig in 1970. Bishopsgate is also mentioned by British band Bloc Party in the song “Ion Square” from their 2008 album Intimacy, where the speaker chronicles the beginnings of a relationship using several London locations.

Question:

If all the track of the London Underground were laid end to end, how far would it reach? (Oct 2012)

  1. 135 miles
  2. 249 miles
  3. 353 miles

Answer

249 miles; Correct at October 2012 249 miles/402km is the total length of the London Underground network, just 45% of which is in tunnels. The number of miles/km travelled by each Tube train each year is a staggering 114,500 miles/184,269km, at an average speed of 33km per hour/20.5mph.

Question:

When this truck was first registered, how many Michelin star restaurants does London have?

  1. 11
  2. 55
  3. 91

Answer

55; Correct at October 2012 there are 55 Michelin star restaurants in London, including 7 two star, and 2 three star establishments.

Question:

Which market street in London boasted the first electric street light?

  1. Electric Avenue, Brixton
  2. Ray St, EC1
  3. LEB’s Head Office, New Broad Street, EC2

Answer

Electric Avenue, Brixton; Best known from the Eddy Grant hit, Electric Avenue was so named in the 1880’s as the first shopping street to be lit by electricity.

Question:

Which famous writer is responsible for ‘Chitty Chitty Bang Bang’?

  1. Roald Dahl
  2. Enid Blyton
  3. Ian Fleming

Answer

Ian Fleming; Fleming, better known as the creator of James Bond, wrote Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Muscial Car, a children’s book, for his son Caspar. Although Roald Dahl was responsible for writing the script for the 1968 British musical film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang which was based on the original book. The book was initially published in three volumes, the first of which was released on 22 October 1964 by Jonathan Cape in London. Fleming took his inspiration for the subject from a series of aero-engined racing cars called “Chitty Bang Bang”, built by Count Louis Zborowski in the early 1920’s at Higham Park.

Question:

How often is the White Tower of London washed?

  1. When decreed by the Queen
  2. It’s touched up annually
  3. Never

Answer

Never; Although it isn’t cleaned on a schedule, the White Tower of London was recently cleaned extensively over a period of 3 years and it is hoped that it will not need that level of cleaning for some 40-60 years.

Question:

Which large vehicle is also a name for Krishna?

  1. Juggernaut
  2. Bulldozer
  3. Lorry

Answer

Juggernaut; A juggernaut, in current English usage, is a literal or metaphorical force regarded as mercilessly destructive and unstoppable. This usage originated in the mid-nineteenth century as an allegorical reference to the Hindu Ratha Yatra temple car, which apocryphally was reputed to crush devotees under its wheels.The figurative sense of the word has ground in mechanics comparable to figurative uses of steamroller or battering ram to mean something overwhelming. Its ground in social behavior is similar to that of bandwagon, but with overtones of devotional sacrifice. Its British English meaning of a large heavy truck or articulated lorry dates from the second half of the twentieth century. The word is derived from the Sanskrit Jagannātha “world-lord”, one of the names of Krishna found in the Sanskrit epics.

Question:

What is the “Bishopsgate Tower” better known as?

  1. The Gherkin
  2. The Pinnacle
  3. The Shard

Answer

The Pinnacle; The Pinnacle, also known as The Bishopsgate Tower and The Helter-Skelter, is a 288 m (945 ft), 63-storey partly constructed skyscraper in the centre of London’s main financial district, the City of London. It is one of several major towers planned for London, others being Shard London Bridge, Heron Tower, 122 Leadenhall Street and the 20 Fenchurch Street redevelopment. On completion, it will become the tallest building in the City of London and the second tallest building in both the United Kingdom and the European Union, after the 310 m (1,020 ft) Shard London Bridge, which is due for completion in May 2012.

Question:

London’s first coin-operated vending machines introduced in the early 1880s, sold what?

  1. Post Cards
  2. Newspapers
  3. Snuff

Answer

Post Cards; During the early 1880s, the first commercial coin-operated vending machines were introduced in London, England and dispensed post cards. English publisher and bookshop owner, Richard Carlisle invented a vending machine for selling books, around the same time.

Question:

Which was the first European country to issue banknotes?

  1. Sweden
  2. Germany
  3. England

Answer

Sweden; The first proper European banknotes were issued by Stockholms Banco, a predecessor of the Bank of Sweden, in 1660, although the bank ran out of coins to redeem its notes in 1664 and ceased operating in that year.

Question:

What is the one place in all of Great Britain that the Queen cannot visit?

  1. House of Commons
  2. House of Lords
  3. 10 Downing Street

Answer

House of Commons; The reason the Queen is not allowed into the House of Commons Chamber dates back to the time of King Charles I during the power struggle between the King and Parliament, which ended with Civil War and the King’s execution. In January 1642 King Charles I and his armed men came to the House of Commons to arrest five of its Members for treason, but the wanted men had already fled. The Speaker, William Lenthall, politely gave up his chair for the King who demanded to know where they were. Kneeling at the King’s feet the Speaker replied with words that have become famous in parliamentary history. ‘May it please Your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here, and I humbly beg Your Majesty’s pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what Your Majesty is pleased to demand of me.’ This reply left no doubt as to where the Speaker’s first duty lay. The king had no choice but to leave and the role of the Speaker as the representative, or spokesperson, of the House of Commons was firmly established. Since that day no monarch has entered the House of Commons Chamber, which is why the State Opening of Parliament takes place in the House of Lords.

Question:

What was the name of the first computer to defeat a World Chess Champion in a tournament?

  1. Deep Blue
  2. Deep Thought
  3. Deep Space

Answer

Deep Blue; Deep Blue was a chess-playing computer developed by IBM. On May 11, 1997, the machine won a six-game match by two wins to one with three draws against world champion Garry Kasparov.[1] Kasparov accused IBM of cheating and demanded a rematch, but IBM refused and dismantled Deep Blue.[2] Kasparov had beaten a previous version of Deep Blue in 1996.

Question:

Who’s statue stands in front of the Warrington Guardian Newspaper offices in Warrington?

  1. Oliver Cromwell’s
  2. Winston Churchill’s
  3. Franklin Roosevelt’s

Answer

Oliver Cromwell’s; The statue of Oliver Cromwell was a gift from the prominent civic figure and non-conformist, Frederick Monks. He offered the statue to the Mayor of Warrington at the beginning of the tercentenary year, a gift which was accepted in July 1899.

Question:

Which band took their name from a leisure centre in Swindon?

  1. Nirvana
  2. Oasis
  3. Reef

Answer

Oasis; Originally known as The Rain, Liam Gallagher (Vocals) suggested that the band name be changed to Oasis. This change was inspired by an Inspiral Carpets tour poster that hung in the Gallagher brothers’ bedroom. One of the venues the poster listed was the Oasis Leisure Centre in Swindon.

Question:

The world’s first hospital X-ray unit was installed in which Glasgow hospital in 1896?

  1. Glasgow Western Infirmary
  2. Glasgow Royal Infirmary
  3. Southern General Infirmary

Answer

Glasgow Royal Infirmary; X-rays were discovered by Willem Rontgen in 1895. By 1896 Dr James Thomas Bottomley (1845-1926), Lord Blythswood (1835-1908) and Dr John Macintyre (1857-1928) of Glasgow Royal Infirmary were collaborating to develop radiographic apparatus for medical use. The world’s first hospital X-ray unit opened in the Royal’s electrical department under Macintyre’s direction that year and Macintyre (with additional assistance from Lord Kelvin) made great strides in improving practical techniques of radiography and produced the first X-ray cinematograph.

Question:

Where was the world’s first public ATM installed in the UK?

  1. Enfield
  2. Heathrow Airport
  3. Park Royal

Answer

Enfield; In simultaneous and independent efforts, engineers in Sweden and Britain developed their own cash machines during the early 1960s. The first of these that was put into use was by Barclays Bank in Enfield Town in North London, United Kingdom, on 27 June 1967. This machine was the first in the UK and was first used by English comedy actor Reg Varney, at the time so as to ensure maximum publicity for the machines that were to become mainstream in the UK.

Question:

In which year did Bishopsgate launch ACT, their Demo & Technical Care Service?

  1. 2016
  2. 1916
  3. 1816

Answer

2016; Our presence in the healthcare and IT market stands as a testimony to the position of trust and itegrity placed on Bishopsgate; not only by our clients, but by the establishments themselves. This level of access and presence, linked to detailed, and in many cases, technical, understanding of our clients products and procedures, delivers a unique visibility and accessibility to field based assets. Bishopsgate launched ACT in September 2016 to further develop our unique position in these market places.

Question:

Where was the world’s first public ATM installed in the UK?

  1. Enfield
  2. Heathrow Airport
  3. Park Royal

Answer

Enfield; In simultaneous and independent efforts, engineers in Sweden and Britain developed their own cash machines during the early 1960s. The first of these that was put into use was by Barclays Bank in Enfield Town in North London, United Kingdom, on 27 June 1967. This machine was the first in the UK and was first used by English comedy actor Reg Varney, at the time so as to ensure maximum publicity for the machines that were to become mainstream in the UK.

Question:

In which year did Bishopsgate launch ACT, their Demo & Technical Care Service?

  1. 2016
  2. 1916
  3. 1816

Answer

2016; Our presence in the healthcare and IT market stands as a testimony to the position of trust and itegrity placed on Bishopsgate; not only by our clients, but by the establishments themselves. This level of access and presence, linked to detailed, and in many cases, technical, understanding of our clients products and procedures, delivers a unique visibility and accessibility to field based assets. Bishopsgate launched ACT in September 2016 to further develop our unique position in these market places.

Question:

ACT is a new Bishopsgate Service, what does ACT stand for?

  1. Able & Careful Technicians
  2. Action Client Targets
  3. Asset Care Team

Answer

Asset Care Team; Our presence in the healthcare and IT market stands as a testimony to the position of trust and itegrity placed on Bishopsgate; not only by our clients, but by the establishments themselves. This level of access and presence, linked to detailed, and in many cases, technical, understanding of our clients products and procedures, delivers a unique visibility and accessibility to field based assets. Bishopsgate launched ACT in September 2016 to further develop our unique position in these market places.

Question:

ACT is a Bishopsgate Service, but what does it stand for?

  1. Immediate Technical Couriers
  2. Asset Care Team
  3. Quality, Care and Value add

Answer

Asset Care Team; Although the acronym may stand for Asset Care Team, the team actually stand for all of the above!

Question:

Why did Bishopsgate decided to start ACT?

  1. To innovate & improve
  2. To reduce customer costs
  3. To provide customer solutions
  4. All of the above

Answer

All of the above; Our presence in the healthcare and IT market stands as a testimony to the position of trust and itegrity placed on Bishopsgate; not only by our clients, but by the establishments themselves. This level of access and presence, linked to detailed, and in many cases, technical, understanding of our clients products and procedures, delivers a unique visibility and accessibility to field based assets. Bishopsgate launched ACT in September 2016 to further develop our unique position in these market places.

Question:

Which company demonstrated the first hand held mobile cell phone in 1973?

  1. Motorola
  2. British Telecom
  3. AT&T

Answer

Motorola; The world’s first mobile phone call was made on April 3, 1973, when Martin Cooper, a senior engineer at Motorola, called a rival telecommunications company and informed them he was speaking via a mobile phone. The phone Cooper used, weighed a hefty 1.1kg and measured in at 228.6x127x44.4mm. With this prototype device, you got 30 minutes of talk-time and it took around 10 hours to charge.

Question:

In what decade was the first hand held mobile cell phone demonstrated?

  1. 1960’s
  2. 1970’s
  3. 1980’s

Answer

1970’s; The world’s first mobile phone call was made on April 3, 1973, when Martin Cooper, a senior engineer at Motorola, called a rival telecommunications company and informed them he was speaking via a mobile phone. The phone Cooper used, weighed a hefty 1.1kg and measured in at 228.6x127x44.4mm. With this prototype device, you got 30 minutes of talk-time and it took around 10 hours to charge.

Question:

Which company launched the first automated cellular network?

  1. Nordic Mobile Telephone
  2. Nippon Telegraph and Telephone
  3. Racal Telecoms

Answer

Nippon Telegraph and Telephone; The first commercial automated cellular network was launched by NTT in Japan in 1979, followed by the launch of Nordic Mobile Telephone (NMT) system in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, in 1981.

Question:

Who said “Women who seek to be equal with men lack ambition”?

  1. Germaine Greer
  2. Maud Armitage
  3. Marilyn Monroe

Answer

Maud Armitage; Maud said this in June 2013 following the merger between Bishopsgate Specialist Installations and Allport Cargo Specialist Services Division when Tim Bloch, Bishopsgate, challenged Maud Armitage, ACS, about her role as a woman in a male dominated logistics industry.